Blog Directory for Your Blog’s Victory

People nowadays are fond of writing blogs. Some write blogs just for the heck of it and some makes blogging a source of income. That’s right. Blogging can generate income as well. But it’s not that simple for your blog to generate money – it must first generate a large number of views. Traffic is the main key. The higher your blog traffic, the higher extra money you will be able to get from your blog. So the main question is – how do you acquire such traffic? How do you promote your blog to the millions of online drifters.

One of the most common way of doing so is through blog directories. Blog directories enlists a large number of blogs that are accessible to the public. They are diversified and segregated in a manner that the topics will correspond to what blog you are looking for. Are you looking for technical stuff? Political matters? Tips for a troubled relationship maybe? It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories.

Are you looking for technical stuff? Political matters? Tips for a troubled relationship maybe? It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories. Blog directories enlists a large number of blogs that are accessible to the public. They are diversified and segregated in a manner that the topics will correspond to what blog you are looking for.

Blog directories enlists a large number of blogs that are accessible to the public. They are diversified and segregated in a manner that the topics will correspond to what blog you are looking for. Are you looking for technical stuff? Political matters? Tips for a troubled relationship maybe? It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories. Are you looking for technical stuff? Political matters? Tips for a troubled relationship maybe?

It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories. Blog directories enlists a large number of blogs that are accessible to the public. They are diversified and segregated in a manner that the topics will correspond to what blog you are looking for. Blog directories enlists a large number of blogs that are accessible to the public.

It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories. Are you looking for technical stuff? Political matters? Tips for a troubled relationship maybe? It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories.

It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories. Are you looking for technical stuff? Political matters? Tips for a troubled relationship maybe? It doesn’t matter what the topic you’re searching for it will always be a good way to promote your blog through blog directories.

In a nutshell, blog directories can be used to boost one’s blog traffic and a perfect way to promote your blog online.

Good Effect of Concise Sigs for Blogs

It is a fact that promoting one’s blog is not the easiest thing to do. Most specially nowadays that blogs can be found anywhere. You can find blogs just about anywhere! Blogs containing various topics and sometimes it serves to be a mini journal. But what’s the use of a blog if no one’s ever reading it? If no one visits your site to read all your entries whether they are informative or entertaining? So what do you do to promote your blog online? Is it really that complicated?

The answer is – it doesn’t have to be hard. Promoting one’s blog can be as easy as redesigning your email signature or sig to your advantage. To make it a promotional vehicle for your blog.

First thing you should remember is that the shorter the sig, the better. A sig doesn’t have to be a mile long. The human memory can only memorize as short as five words so keep in mind that you must never exceed that number of words. Also most importantly, never forget to include in your signature vital information regarding your blog. Information such as the name of your website, the name of your blog and other links that you think will help your blog achieve the maximum number of visits.

Signatures can range from 1 to 4 words. It has to be catchy so that the readers will remember them and as a result they will visit all the links you have posted there. Here are some of the signatures that you can actually use. Take a good look at the pattern shown here to have an idea on how to have a simple yet effective sig to promote your blog.

Information such as the name of your website, the name of your blog and other links that you think will help your blog achieve the maximum number of visits should be present. Signatures can range from 1 to 4 words. It has to be catchy so that the readers will remember them and as a result they will visit all the links you have posted there. Here are some of the signatures that you can actually use.

Take a good look at the pattern shown here to have an idea on how to have a simple yet effective sig to promote your blog. First thing you should remember is that the shorter the sig, the better. A sig doesn’t have to be a mile long. The human memory can only memorize as short as five words so keep in mind that you must never exceed that number of words. Also most importantly, never forget to include in your signature vital information regarding your blog.

Those are some of the signatures that you can actually use. Take a good look at the pattern shown here to have an idea on how to have a simple yet effective sig to promote your blog. Signatures can range from 1 to 4 words. It has to be catchy so that the readers will remember them and as a result they will visit all the links you have posted there.

So now you know that concise sig can make a difference on your blog’s exposure. Keep this in mind and have a happy blogging experience.

3 Great Benefits of Playing Online Strategy Games

If you love playing video games then you’ll be glad to know that you can benefit very much from them in more ways than just getting entertained. In fact, playing online strategy games has been found to be exceptionally useful to most people. These games require players to plan far ahead and this helps them develop considerable brain power. The main areas of development include:

1. Concentration: The ability to concentrate is enhanced greatly since you are required to focus very much on different aspects of the game. Lapses in concentration can lead to your losing the game.

2. Memory: Strategy games tend to have many different elements and also various aspects that unfold at the same time. If you cannot remember them all then you will not be able to perform well in them.

3. Observation: It is very necessary to spot various changes as soon as they appear in the game or else you will not be able to take advantage of them in time. In fact, you need to stay alert at all times or else you will not be able to stay ahead of the game.

You are sure to see a marked improvement in your mental prowess if you play online strategy games very frequently. The three skills listed here will enable you to plan ahead very easily and they will also help you think very logically. This will help you tremendously in your personal and professional life. As a matter of fact, people who fear that their mental powers are slowing down should certainly start playing these games.

There are many different games you could play, based upon your preferences. While war games are the most popular online strategy games, there are also other categories of games, particularly ones that cater to girls and women.

Make sure that you select the right websites where you can play the games of your choice. Flash sites enable you to play extremely realistic games right from your browser without having to download them to your computer, thereby keeping your computer free of bulky software. This also protects it from viruses. It is also a good idea to learn how to play online strategy games so that you do not miss out on any opportunity to win these games. Multiplayer games can get very competitive and you need to be very adept at them to get the maximum enjoyment from them.

Top 10 Games for Your iPad

I am using my iPad device for games when I want to relax and that’s why I collected the best 10 games and put them in a list for you. What criteria have I used to make this list? – Fun, Unique, Value, Competitive. Let’s start:

1. Angry Birds

Angry Birds is the most addictive and fun game I’ve ever played. The people from Rovio did really great job developing this game and offer us plenty of versions. These birds that have special powers will bring novelty in your gaming experience and some brand new ideas. You will feel more competitive wherever you go.

2. FIFA 2013

This FIFA franchise didn’t disappoint from its start on iOS, and each game is coming better and better. There are new online challenges all the time. The 2013 version didn’t give us any bigger improvements but we are satisfied with the added onscreen button for skill moves.

3. Need For Speed: Most Wanted

If you are into fast cars and adrenaline, this game is the right for you. EA did a great job with this version. This time they give us intent action with great graphics which are notable on the iPad 3 and iPad 4.

4. The Room

The best puzzle game ever played on iOS The developers have added clear graphics and while playing it on Retina you will feel the best experience ever. This game only supports iPad 2 or greater.

5. Sky Gamblers: StormRaiders

This flight-action game will put you right in middle of WW2 flying vintage air-craft in single and lots of multiplayer missions. It includes satisfying quality with easy-to-handle controls. This game features many missions that will keep you really busy.

6. SpellTower

SpellTower is highly rated word playing game. The latest update gave support for Retina and multiplayer mode.

7. Star Wars: Knights of the old republic

Maybe the controls will be difficult for you but when you get used to them you will feel the real Mass Effect experience behind this game.

8. Wipeout

This game is developed exclusively for the iPad. If you have seen the show you know what to do. Race against the clock to beat the old records and you will be okay. The really fun part is when you fall and when you watch the replays.

9. Infinity Blade

The latest upgrade of this game includes better console-quality graphics. You can still use the swipe-based swordplay, the weapon upgrading and you will see lots of killing. It’s not recommended for kids.

10. Plants vs. Zombies

Once you get started you will not be able to take your eyes of it. It’s a version with new mini modes and games that bring you new experience out of the standard levels.

Book Review: The Shallows, by Nicholas Carr

The question of whether new media technologies are mind numbing is an age old one, going back to classical antiquity. Nicholas Carr, in his new book The Shallows, a nuanced and considered study on the ill effects of too much Internet usage, uses the fascinating example of Plato and Socrates.

History of New Media Technologies

In Plato’s well-known dialogue Phaedrus, the philosopher has Socrates discussing the merits of writing with Phaedrus. Socrates relates a story about a meeting between the Egyptian god Theuth, who amongst other things invented the alphabet, and Thamus, a king of Egypt. The technologically savvy Theuth argues that writing will be a boon to society, allowing for the storage of information and hence providing ‘a recipe for memory and wisdom’. Thamus disagrees, and suggests that writing will have a deleterious effect on memory as people lazily rely on what is held in these early data banks. Thamus goes on to say that writing will not create true wisdom, as people will not cultivate their minds. It will rather create a kind of fake wisdom. The dialogue makes clear that Socrates agrees with Thamus.

Plato was not on Socrates’ side in this matter. In The Republic he argues against poetry, which in antiquity represented the oral tradition. Poetry was declaimed in public, rather than written down. Plato felt the advantages of writing superior to a purely oral culture. Writing would encourage the reader to be logical, self-reliant and rigorous.

Even back in fourth century BC Greece there was concern that the new technology of alphabet based writing had the power to change the way the mind worked. Many centuries later, modern machines would have a noticeable effect on thought and literature. In 1882 German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche found his eye sight failing and couldn’t concentrate when trying to write with pen and paper. To resolve this problem he ordered a Danish-made Malling-Hansen Writing Ball typewriter, which would allow him to close his eyes and tap away on the keys. The philosopher found that the forceful banging of the contraption during composition had a discernable effect on his writing, making his prose tighter and more telegraphic. He concluded that, ‘Our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts.’

The Shallows has an alarming subtitle: what the Internet is doing to our brains. It’s tempting to think from this eye-catching book blurb that Nicholas Carr is keen to scold Internet users and predict the decline and fall of Western civilisation. This is thankfully not the case, and The Shallows surprises with its long historical view and balanced analysis of how media affects the quality of our thinking and reading. For every advance in information technology, there has been a clamour of voices warning of its dangers. When the Gutenberg press revolutionised the accessibility of information, Robert Burton, author of An Anatomy of Melancholy (1628), bemoaned the plethora of books and the mental befuddlement they caused. “One of the great diseases of the age is the multitude of books that doth so overcharge the world that it is not able to digest the abundance of idle matter that is every day hatched and brought into the world”. Sound familiar?

How the Internet Affects the Way We Read and Think

The basic conclusion of The Shallows is that what a new technology gives with the one hand, it takes away with the other. The more ease and convenience the Internet places before us, the more it takes away from our ability to exercise our brains more rigorously. It promotes light, scattered reading. And for all the information we so hurriedly glean, much of it is quickly forgotten. If it is remembered, it’s so fractured that it can’t be integrated into an overriding schema or logic that benefits our understanding of the world, or ourselves.

The Shallows provides many examples of how cognition is diminished by the Internet’s powerful ability to store, collect and sort information for us. In one study, two separate groups of people were set an identical online task. One group used programs that provided helpful prompts, therefore making the task more ‘user friendly’. The second group were not given these same prompts, but had to figure out the task more for themselves. Eight months later the two groups were assembled again to do the same puzzle. Those who had done the more intellectually demanding program, were able to complete the task twice as quickly as the ‘user friendly’ program group. Dutch Researcher Christof van Nimwegen found that the group using the more difficult program were able to plan ahead and plot strategy, while the other group relied more on trial and error to get through their puzzle.

Another study mapped how much information is retained when reading text with hyperlinks. Hyperlinks have been hailed by many educationalists as a new path to improved learning. To test this theory, Canadian scholars gave seventy people an Elizabeth Bowen short story to read, ‘The Demon Lover’. One group read the story straight through, without links. The second group read the story studded with hyperlinks, as you’d find in any online article. The hypertext readers in subsequent interviews on what they had read reported they found the story confusing and ‘very jumpy’. The other group had no such difficulties.

To add further alarm to this mix, one researcher tracked the eye movements of Web users, by attaching a small camera that plotted eye movements as they read pages of text. The eye reads Web pages in the shape of an F. We merely read the first few lines of text, then the eye quickly plummets to the bottom of the page. (Disheartening news for those writing online articles!)

What are the lessons to be drawn from The Shallows? The Internet is surely an awesome and powerful tool that has enhanced our lives incredibly. Who wants to go back to standing in bank queues when all your banking can be done from the comfort of home? What writer or researcher would want to go back to haunting the stacks and dusty corridors of libraries, when so much more can be accessed with the click of a mouse?

An over reliance, or obsession, with the Internet as the be all and end all of wisdom, intelligence and information, however, is a mistake. Just as pre-literate societies produced great oral poetry, and could cultivate a deep intellectual and philosophical consciousness, so can we moderns also find other routes to intellectual stimulation. Reading books without the non-stop interruptions of the Internet is one way. Sitting in a silent natural setting, and ‘reading nature’, is another way (again, studies have found that we think much more clearly in these peaceful environments).

A reading culture that is now moving inexorably to the Internet from the printed page is a culture of ‘F’ shaped reading: superficial, fragmented, shallow and forgetful. What this means for our intellectual and cultural future is anyone’s guess.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6310706

Used Books: Where To Find Them And Why

The popularity of purchasing used books seems to be rising with more people opting for cheap books still in good condition. Some say there’s nothing like the smell of new prints and stepping into an upscale store that carries expensive titles. But another half sticks by previously owned books, stating that the amazing deals you can get are enough to fill a small library.

It’s true that purchasing new prints has an appeal but they’re sometimes practically unsound. The amount of wood needed to manufacture paper is staggering even if trees are sourced from sustainable forests. Not every buyer decides to retain every purchased book either which amounts to a waste of money and resources if discarded.

The same can’t be said of previously owned books. It’s a form of recycling that makes a big impact on how much money and resources can be saved. Textbooks, in particular, are valuable for students unable to afford new and expensive books. An added invaluable benefit is the notes and points jotted down by previous owners which help future students during tests and examinations. The same used books can also be resold for almost the same price. This is true for educational books like encyclopedias as well.

Used book dealers can be found in almost every town. The range of titles they carry is also impressive. Stores are generally classified into two types, those that sell general reading materials and others that deal in rare books. This isn’t always the case with independent stores though chain bookstores do carry them albeit at the printed price.

Like chains and independent stores, most used book sellers are taking to cyberspace to market their wares in addition to having brick and mortar stores. This strategy allows customers to choose from a very wide selection of titles at a cheap cost. In fact, online marketing is the only way for many customers to find desperately needed titles especially if they live in a place where bookstores are few.

Used bookstores are typically set up by small enterprises, individuals and charity groups. A majority of the books are donated and a few purchased from used book dealers. While stores selling rare and antiquated titles usually set themselves apart, shops carrying general purpose books may also have rare titles hidden away in the shelves.

Perhaps one of the biggest contributions used books make to society is making available much-needed tomes to the underprivileged. In regions where illiteracy is high and poverty pervasive, the idea of purchasing brand new books is unthinkable. Charity organizations that aim to increase literacy are better off distributing used books because it saves money and gets the job done. The fact that it also keeps precious books from ending up in landfills is a bonus.

For donors, donating or selling used books is a great way to get rid of junk. Depositing old books in the trash is painful for anyone but they do take up a lot of space. Charity groups regularly hold drives inviting communities to donate used books while dealers buy them. Some online stores also have a buy/sell strategy and a few go the swapping route (customers swap their used books for other used books). So whichever way you look at it, there are benefits to be enjoyed by all stakeholders which is why previously owned books have even facilitated the establishment of popular centers for used book sellers.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7891207

Massacre of the Innocents – Game of Thrones The Brutal

A FRIEND of mine posted on Facebook that a recent episode of Game of Thrones left her gasping. I thought she was being melodramatic until I watched the penultimate episode of Season 3 myself. If the various YouTube compilations of people’s reactions to this climactic episode is anything to go by, I wasn’t the only one caught off guard. It might even be a seminal moment in television history; yet not for obvious reasons.

Only those who have read the novels (A Song of Fire and Ice) were fully prepared for the grisly turn of events in The Rains of Castamere. One would think accolades should go to the writers and the director for finding the right pacing and style that managed to lull audiences into a false sense of nuptial merriment shortly before having the throats of their favourite characters slit in quick succession. Genuine shock and awe for a television series is no easy feat in this day and age of media saturation and it seems producers nowadays will go to any lengths. Most reviews on the Internet have been quick to attribute the shock tactics of the Red Wedding, as it is known among fans, to some clever direction combined with the sudden killing off of many beloved characters all at once. Yet if we dig a little deeper we will see that perhaps the real reason why the scene continues to resonate is because the HBO writer- producers have broken a television taboo while simultaneously alluding to an even darker one.

One gets the feeling that HBO is competing with ACM’s The Walking Dead in the shock and gore stakes, an assumption which has less to do with the White Walkers and everything with the wedding’s pivotal murder: the stabbing to death of Robb Stark’s pregnant wife. This barbaric foeticide – she is stabbed right in her stomach multiple times – sets in motion the whole wedding massacre sequence. Yet in spite of all the slit throats and spraying blood that follows, the viewer is left feeling bewildered, if not slightly numb from that opening murder. I’ve sat through quite a number of fantasy and horror movies in my time and yet I can’t seem to recall any instances of a pregnant woman being explicitly stabbed in her stomach – certainly not in a made-for-television program. If there are such cases, then they are extremely rare. Conan the Barbarian of early Schwarzenegger fame comes to mind, albeit young Conan’s pregnant mother is beheaded rather than stabbed. On the other hand, some powerful comparisons present themselves in art when we turn our attention to that loose biblical oeuvre concerned with the legend of the Massacre of the Innocents. Indeed, as Game of Thrones evolves, its writers seem to be reaching more and more for the ancient myths on their bookshelves. Supposedly George R.R. Martin, the architect behind the novels, drew inspiration for the wedding massacre from an infamous Black Dinner in Scottish history. Some critics, however, have seen fit to draw comparisons between drone attacks on weddings in Afghanistan, something which is maliciously lampooned in The Duffel Blog. To my mind though, the wedding massacre, along with numerous other little acts of barbarism and revenge throughout the series – the eunuch’s story, the incestuous siblings, the killing of the unborn heir, etcetera – share more in common with Greek tragedy or Herodotus’ rambling Histories, where it is par for the course for newly installed royals to put to the sword their rival’s children and pregnant women, particularly in Persia (incidentally, all those ‘exotic’ 19th century stereotypes that litter the ‘oriental’ lands Across The Narrow Sea, where Daenerys and her dragons roam, must have Edward W. Said turning in his grave). That some of the underlying themes of Game of Thrones/ Fire and Ice are being generated by the archetypes of Greek literature is borne out by Bran Stark’s legend about the Night’s Watch and the cook feeding the visiting king his own son baked in a pie. It is a familiar tale that finds its antecedents in the ancient Greek myths of Pelops being served up as a meal to the Gods and Atreus serving up the flesh of his brother’s sons at another feast (the same myths influenced Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus by way of Senecan revenge tragedies). At that same fireside chat between the crippled Bran Stark and his young companions we get the sacred laws of hospitality. This is an indirect reference to the wedding massacre, which itself was preceded by the Starks being given salt and bread, a guarantee of safety under another lord’s roof. This law of hospitality is directly borrowed from the ancient Greek world. We are reminded of it throughout the Odyssey, for instance; a law which is savagely broken by the Cyclops when he dashes out the brains of Odysseus’s comrades and devours them.

The cannibal’s meal is served up to viewers again in Season 3 in one of those tedious torture scenes involving Theon Greyjoy, where his inexhaustible tormentor is seen eating a pork sausage in the wake of Theon’s emasculation. Eli Roth was lambasted for his 2005 gothic horror gem Hostel and the “torture porn” that it ostensibly promulgated, and yet here we have elements of this same torture porn repackaged within a HBO series and aired weekly on cable television and illegal downloads. At one level, these drawn-out dungeon sessions with a hapless Theon Greyjoy evoke gothic memories of the old Hammer House of Horror films; at another level, the overt sexual connotations of the torturing cannot belie its homosexual sadism, all but laid bare by that pork sausage moment. In any event, this sort of HBO torture porn, together with just about every episode of The Walking Dead, are further examples of the extent to which mainstream television – which is what HBO and AMC are basically becoming – have appropriated the once vilified conceits of the R-rated horror and splatter genres for global mass consumption (yes, even in Afghanistan).

Another movie that I have heard about but not seen is the French À l’Intérier, which is inspired by one of those real-life nightmares in which one woman is determined to get her hands on the unborn baby of another woman by whatever means necessary. The newspapers and Internet abound with sordid crime stories of pregnant women being killed or even slit open in a grim travesty of a caesarean. Which brings me back to that darker taboo adumbrated by the barbaric stabbing of a pregnant Talisa at the Red Wedding: that of the back-alley abortion. Like so many hypocrisies parodied in Robert Altman’s The Player, the topic of abortion was once strictly off-limits in mainstream Hollywood, with only a handful of studio films being able to get it past the editing table. Even today the subject of backyard abortionism is usually relegated to documentaries and art-house films, such as the winner of the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days. Independent horror films, on the other hand, never had any such trepidations; indeed, the spectre of abortion is very often extrapolated or demonized through the grisly carnage perpetrated by the slasher or zombies, a macabre device which can be seen at work in Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, The Eye 2, Black Christmas, and more recently in ACM’s The Walking Dead, just to name a few. All of these horror movies (and shows) elicit the unconscious terrors of the butchered abortion, an all-too-common reality of the 19th and early 20th centuries when male white societies in the West and in the Soviet Bloc illegalized abortion and forced young pregnant women into the hands of sleazy charlatans, nowhere better epitomized than in the harrowing 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days. Abortion has been around since the beginnings of civilisation and for much of that history it was performed by competent midwives who knew how to use the most effective abortifacients (herbal poisons). Yet there is also a long list of frightening abortion tools that have been used in recent history, the most primitive of all probably being the most modern: the household coat hanger. Without modern hygiene or anaesthesia, the usage of such instruments can result in death for the woman as well as the unborn child. The butchered abortion: an image which finds its most powerful expression in the blade and the swollen womb, whether it be in a Renaissance painting or a fantasy television series.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7791030